Thank you Madrid!

So my last post on here was written pretty soon after I reached Madrid for my 2 and a half month research/training trip. It is safe to say that arriving in Madrid with the worst cold I’ve had in a long time put a haze of sadness over what I thought was in store for me. I spent that first weekend (and pretty much week) wrapped up in bed only leaving the flat to go to work.

Fast forward 9 weeks and cannot believe how quickly I have fallen in love with Spain. As I sit here in the airport waiting to catch my flight back home I can’t help but think back to everything I have learnt during my time here.

Apart from being introduced to a new language (which I’m still fairly shy to speak but I WILL get better). I have experienced a new culture, which yes of course was strange for me at first, but once I embraced it, parts become second nature (namely the coffee and food parts).

I became more confident in my skills as a scientist and my ability to work in new and different environments with changing teams. I was taught new skills by experts in parasitology diagnosis and I learnt that even they, these wonderfully intelligent people get stressed, have doubts and experience days where they want to just give up.

Uprooting my ‘life’ for 3 (ish) months taught me so much about myself. Firstly, I CAN do it. It may not always seem like it but I’ve actually come quite far from the person that started her PhD journey a year ago.

I really like learning about different cultures, countries and their history and it is fairly naive to think that only your matters.

I’m leaving Spain with new loves but also the most comfortable I have ever been with myself. I’m a young South African, British, Manx, Muslim, Female Scientist and I love each part and the role they have played in shaping me.

This experience reinforced what my parents have always told me: that opportunities are all around you but nothing will just fall into your lap. You have to work hard for what you want. The world will not think it owes you anything. But you owe yourself to be/do the best you can.

I’m going to end this post with one piece of advice: Just go for it.

Keep Reading!

H 🙂

5 things every phd student should have.

Hi everyone!

I thought I’d write a short post about what, after near enough a year, I have found I can’t really live without.

So here they are – the FIVE things that I will not leave for university without.

  • diary / calendar – because well, how else are you meant to keep track of the HUNDREDS of things you have to do in a day?
  • good headphones – these have two  uses: 1. put on whatever gets you in the mood to be the most productive 2. if you don’t want to listen to anything, put these in and you’ll have blocked out any background noise.
  • a meeting book – you’ll probably have more than one meeting a day and meetings tend to follow on from each other so by having a dedicated book you can have a record of each meeting you attend in one easy to find place.
  • organisational stationary – plastic wallets, folders, post-its, paperclips, stapler/staples. You’ll always need them so just don’t take them out of your bag.
  • a decent water bottle – keep hydrated people! I tend to spend a lot of times in labs where drinking/eating is a major no no, but when I’m back in the office it’s always good to find a bottle of water in my bag. Staying hydrated helps with your focus and to relieve headaches.

There you have it, the 5 things I think every PhD student should have.

Keep Reading!

H :).

Long Breaks vs Short & Frequent

Hey Guys :).

For this post I decided to address a question I get asked quite a lot – is it better to have one long break during the year or have multiple short/quick ones throughout it?

Both of these have pros and cons. So let’s start with a Long Break.

Pros

  • There is enough time between the beginning and end to actually relax.
  • You have something big and exciting to look forward to.
  • The time off will allow you to miss and appreciate your work much more.

Cons

  1. You are taking a big chunk of time out of your research/work.
  2. If you decide to have a completely work free time, you will most likely miss out on announcements, events and deadlines.
  3. Regardless of how you left it – your work WILL pile up.

Short & Frequent.

Pros

  • You can have lots of these in the year.
  • You have something to look forward to.
  • They can help plan your work/research by seperating them into shorter managable ‘chunks’.

Cons

  1. Usually only a couple of days.
  2. Can interrupt the work flow.
  3.  You try to pack a lot into a short time so you can come out the other just as tired.

There will inevitably be more to add to these lists but I just wanted to give a quick and simple idea of what to expect.

From personal experience of taking a Long Break, I think I’ll be sticking to the Short & Frequent approach going forward. Though it was good to have an extended time off, the work pile up and time being out of touch with my work was not worth it for me. It wasn’t all bad though, I had sufficient time to unwind, spend time with family and being away reminded me how much I actually enjoy what I do – and being reminded of your passion is never a bad thing :).

My advice would be with whichever approach you decide to take, way up the pros and cons and how they will affect you before making the decision.

Oh, and it’s not a bad thing to need a break. It may be hard to admit that at some point it’s all getting a bit too much but more than likely everyone around is feeling a similar way and it’s okay not to be okay.

 

Keep Reading!

H. 🙂

 

 

 

 

De Montfort University – SAHRC 2016

A little post about a conference I recently attended!

The 15th June 2016 marked the day of De Montfort University’s inaugural ‘School of Allied Health Science Research Conference’ where I was lucky enough to be offered the opportunity to give an oral and poster presentation on some of my research.

The day consisted of:

A broad spectrum of posters outlining some of the research that is being conducted within the School (from both staff and students).

The Keynote (delivered by Professor Mark Jobling, University of Leicester) titled ‘Sex, surnames and the history of Britain’ and an overview of Research in the School of Allied Health Sciences (Dr.Pravez Haris, Head of Research for the School of Allied Health Sciences).

A range of different topics presented by Early Career Researchers in the School. Which were then followed by presentations from some of the School’s postgraduate students (including me!)

The day ended with the closing address from the Pro- VC and Dean of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, who also gave out certificates and prizes to the poster and oral presentation winners.

As a whole, the day was really enjoyable and interesting to find out about the other research going on in the school.

Even though I have attended a conference before this was my first time presenting at one and it was a totally different (some-what nerve wrecking) experience.

 

Here’s what I learnt from it all:

  • PRACTICE – Even though I practiced quite a lot (or so I thought) and knew my presentation slides well, if I could go back I’d practice more.
  • You are going to be nervous – especially if it’s your first time. But it’s okay, the audience you are presenting to understand this and most (of not all) will have been in your position at one point or another.
  • Expect questions – answering questions was one of the areas that I think I was most nervous about but one piece of advice I’d give is when practicing – do it in front of one or two people because they will most likely have questions. Oh, and if you don’t know the answer -be honest.
  • Don’t fill your slides with text – the audience will be focused on trying to read all the text instead of listening to you. So try and use images/diagrams to aid your story.
  • Make sure you stick to the time frame given e.g. if your allotted time is 15 mins including questions, try to talk for 12 minutes (10-13 slides) which allows time for questions at the end.
  • Try and enjoy it! You’ve put time and effort into preparing for this so enjoy it.

 

Attend as many of these as you can – it can be difficult to decide when and where you are going to attend a conference (time off, travel costs etc) but conferences like this one which are at your own university or in your own city are good to attend. They give you the chance to practice your presentation skills and allow you to learn about research you may not even realize is being done. You’ll meet people you may have not met before and be introduced to topics that could impact your research too.

 

Overall I had a great time and am definitely looking forward to the next one!

Keep Reading,

H 🙂

My First Conference!

Hi Everybody,

So not so long ago I was fortunate enough to be invited to a local BioMed conference (the first of many – I hope!) and boy – oh – boy was was it wonderful. Well, I can say that now- at the time I was terrified ( the good sort of terrified where you just do not want to say anything silly ). It was filled with some of the most inspiring people I have met to date. I don’t just mean the work that they were doing but the people that they were. Listening to their dedication and passion for their chosen paths made me think about mine – Where did I want to be in 3 years? What do I want to do now? What is the aim of my research? Why did I choose Microbiology/Parasitology? How did I aim to achieve my goals?

Throughout the day I mix and mingled with a range of different people – Medical Doctors, Members of Government, Environmental Scientists, Investors and the list goes on. The one thing I learnt from speaking to all of them – KNOW YOURSELF. Not necessarily to justify your choices but to help them understand your work. Now, being my first conference I was very nervous when I had to talk about my work/aims (and I’m not usually a nervous person) however, as the day went on I became more confident in myself and could essentially “pitch” myself a lot better. Talking about yourself is usually pretty easy once you get going but you have to remember you aren’t JUST talking about you and your life – you are there because of your work and your work/research still needs to maintain a level of confidentiality. Thankfully, my supervisors were able to give me some pointers about what I should be speaking about.

Overall the day was great, I met a bunch of wonderful people and learnt a lot about the type of scientist I want to be and though I may not have all the answers to my questions (and theirs) I am definitely closer.

I would strongly recommend to anyone to attend conferences. They may seem daunting at the beginning but as the day goes on you’ll see the benefit through the cloud of fear.

Keep Reading,

H 🙂